Four tips to ease your horror when you're up against the best final year team in the competition

KIM KOELMEYER


As competition season heats up, we invite students from all year levels to compete. But sometimes, your competition campaign is cut tragically short when you find yourself up against that final-year team who is destined to win the entire tournament. You know, the one that has competed in three moots a year since its inception?


Here are our top tips for getting through this truly unfortunate situation. Our hearts are with you.


Stay Calm


You couldn’t help but notice the change in atmosphere when they popped up on Zoom. Everyone, including you, knows they are going to take home the virtual trophy (especially with that Armani apparel!) So the prospect of going against that team is guaranteed to set off a few nerves.


Take a few deep breaths - your task now is to lose gracefully rather than spectacularly. The key to that is staying calm and collected.


Check Your Notes


Who knows, maybe the key to winning this un-winnable round is hiding at the bottom of your pile of prep work? You never know what smoking gun miiiiiight be there - or even on that sheet lying on the floor. Really, anything will do right now.


Give it a try while your opposition breeze through material you spent all night getting right.


Lean on Your Partner


One great part of competitions is you’re often with a partner, which means someone to share the misery with.


Take advantage of your partnership by communicating how you are destined to lose. We recommend covert eyebrow signals into the webcam, or a frantic private message if you’re feeling especially desperate. There’s nothing like teamwork!


Accept Your Fate


While this may put a damper on your competition, take solace in the fact that they are due to graduate any day now.


Sit in awe of their incredible points and flawless rebuttals as they systematically take home the win. Learn what you can, and start planning your outfit for the grand final.


There’s always next year.



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